Where Has God Placed You as an Intercessor?

When you are called to serve God as an intercessor, and you say “Yes” to Him, don’t be surprised where He will place you for the purposes of intercession.

Intercessors are called to affect the atmosphere around them, wherever that may be. God will allow them to see and hear circumstances and strategies for the purpose of intercession. God shows intercessors what He wants to do, where and how He wants to move. The intercessor responds by saying, “Yes, God. Come and do that.”

I’ve known intercessors who work in schools, businesses, court houses, government. I’ve known intercessors who work in the fashion industry and the finance industry and who work in hospitals or drive school buses. Some intercessors are called to travel overseas, to write books (and invite the Holy Spirit to move through their words), to drive for Uber. One intercessor I know works in an office with people from many different faiths and cultures. She carries the peace of Christ and looses His peace in her workplace every day. One intercessor I know prays from her home all day. Her husband is called to the marketplace. She is called to sit in her yard, listen to God, and pray as He leads.

As an intercessor I used to work on a church staff. Now I work in the marketplace, and I am also involved in community prayer. In the marketplace, I have the privilege to work behind the scenes to discover how God is moving in various industries. The more I listen, the more strategy I sense for how to pray.

I pray for the individuals I’m listening to, in whatever ways God leads. I pray for their families. I pray for the struggles they encounter in business. And I follow God’s strategy in praying for what He desires to do through the people He has placed in those industries. I don’t have a deep knowledge of those industries. But I know God has already placed people there, whether they know it yet or not. So I pray for God to help the intercessors and those who have a heart for Him that He has placed in those industries.

It’s a stealth mission of intercession (as many intercessory callings are). No one knows I am praying. God has placed me anonymously behind the scenes. I simply need to listen to God, hear His heart, and pray as He leads.

I need to know what I have authority to pray … and what I don’t have authority to pray. I can’t pray in ways that would violate a person’s free will or in a way that would disregard where the enemy has rights. I certainly don’t want to pray against any territorial spirit or principalities. That is in God’s hands, not mine. But I can loose the Holy Spirit all day long. And the more intentionally and closely I listen to God, the more I can pray to invite Him into each situation that comes across my desk each day.

I also walk with a group of people in daily accountability. This helps me make sure I am staying within my authority as an intercessor. It helps me keep my heart focused on God. And I have people covering me in prayer as I do what He calls me to do. If you’re an intercessor, I recommend that you also have accountability and a prayer covering. See my article Why Every Intercessor Needs a Cover for more on why intercessors need intercessors.

God wants us, as intercessors, to invite Him into the situations that surround us. He wants us to say “Yes” to whatever He desires to do. He wants us to affect our atmosphere daily, everywhere we go, by loosing the Holy Spirit and the Peace of Christ around us.

Wherever He has placed you as an intercessor in this season, bloom where you are planted. Ask Him to show you how to intercede right where you are each day. And stay close to His heart, be aware of what He is showing you. Pray as He leads. You may not see the changes right away (sometimes you will!). But you will know by faith that God is working in response to your prayers. And your time with Him each day will bless you in amazing ways.

 

10 Things Moses Has Taught Me about Intercession

I did an inductive Bible study of Exodus 32-34, looking especially at the role of Moses as intercessor between God and His people. Being an intercessor myself, I was curious what Moses could teach us today about intercession. Following are just a few of the takeaways I learned from studying this passage:

Students of Inductive Bible Study will note that for each number below, the first paragraph is my “inference” and the second paragraph is my “observation.” While I made each observation first, I listed the inference first in this article because I want to emphasize the takeaways (inferences).

1. Exodus 32:7

Moses’s intercession is based on two truths: These are God’s people, and Moses is identified with them.

God associates the people with Moses and says Moses brought them out of Egypt. By contrast, in 32:11-12 Moses counters that the people are God’s (and repeats this in 33:13) and that God brought them out of Egypt. Meanwhile the people attribute this feat to “gods” represented by a molten calf (32:4, 8).

2. Exodus 32:12-13

God’s plan for the people is greater than the people’s sinful actions. God’s mission in the world is not thwarted by their actions.

This passage shows a contrast between God’s wrath and His promises. Moses is the mediator who voices this contrast. In response to the contrast that Moses presents, God turns from His desire to destroy the people (32:14). In this passage, we see that God “thought” to do this “evil” rather than “planned” it (32:14).

Note that God doesn’t really do “evil,” but it was perceived as such by humans. God’s wrath comes only from His holiness and our violation of that holiness through idolatry and other sin. That’s why we need a savior: Jesus Christ.

3. Exodus 32:14

Moses says “Yes” to God’s own plan, and God responds to affirm that plan. Moses doesn’t ask God to do anything He hasn’t already planned to do by His own power.

The turning point of 32:14 follows several reminders: the people belong to God (32:11); God led them out of Egypt (32:11); God’s promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Israel (32:13); and that God’s promise was made by God’s own power – that God swore by His own self (32:13).

4. Exodus 32:11

Moses’s intercession appeals to God’s plan and promise and does not deny what the people deserve.

Moses’s intercession is described with the word “besought.” The Hebrew word is חלה, defined in this context as “mollify, pacify, appease,” seeking favor in place of wrath (Brown-Driver-Briggs). The same dynamic seems to take place in 33:13. The connotation acknowledges the reality of God’s wrath and seeks favor despite it. Moses places that search for favor in the promises of God (32:13).

5. Exodus 32:7-8

The relationship of Moses toward God is characterized by trust.

Moses learns about the people’s rebellion at first, not by sight, but by God’s words. Moses’ response (32:11-13) indicates Moses believes God.

6. Exodus 32:12

God wants the nations of the world to recognize who He is. God’s promise and plan is for the world.

The words of Moses acknowledge that the way God deals with His people will be seen by the Egyptians. Even though the people have been delivered from slavery in Egypt, the reader of this passage is reminded that the nations are watching.

7. Exodus 32:9-10

God’s promises and covenant, not His wrath, constitute God’s plan to overcome the pride and stubbornness of the people. God’s focus is on restoration, not retribution.

Although Moses asks God to turn from His anger, Moses does not express any disagreement with God that the people are stiff-necked. The Hebrew word for “stiff-necked” is קשה ערף, a figurative description of Israel’s obstinance (Brown-Driver-Briggs). Moses reminds God immediately of His promises to the ancestors of the people.

8. Exodus 33:12-16

Intercession is corporate. Individual relationship with God has a corporate impact and is for the sake of the people. Moses identifies with God’s people and approaches God corporately on their behalf. The characteristics that God has given to Moses in approaching Him are meant for the entire people. Corporate intercession is focused on God’s larger plan of restoration in the world.

This passage interweaves Moses’ personal interactions toward God along with Moses’ corporate identification with the people he belongs to. Twice Moses mentions “I and thy people” (33:16). When Moses asks for favor, he speaks first personally and then reminds God that the people are God’s (33:13). Moses identities himself with the nation and reminds God that the nation is God’s. Moses reminds God about qualities that characterize their relationship (presence, favor), and he connects these with a larger corporate relationship.

9: Exodus 32:8-13, 33:16

God allows intercession despite the scope of the people’s sinful disposition. The turning away of God’s wrath is not because punishment was undeserved or because His holiness could tolerate idolatry and rebellion. Rather, the turning away of His wrath was for the sake of the bigger picture of God’s mission in the world and His desire to bring restoration to His people. God is faithful to keep His promises for the sake of His mission in the world – not because anyone has earned it, but because He has a plan.

Moses pleads with God despite the people’s rebellion, idolatry, self-absorption, worship and sacrifice to a false god, and stiff-necked obstinance. Moses reminds God of the details of His history with these people. Here the scope of this passage widens for the reader, so the current rebellion can be set against God’s larger work in the nation of Israel and in the world. There is a common factor in Moses’ first and third attempts at intercession that both receive a positive response from the LORD. That common factor is Moses’ mention of how God’s relationship with Israel is distinct in the world.

10. Exodus 32:30-35

Sin has a corporate impact. Corporate relationship with God is just as important as individual relationship. The role of intercessor between the people and God does not carry the power of atonement.

Moses offers himself as atonement for the people’s sin. God does not seem to accept Moses’ offer. Throughout this paragraph, the author refers to “the people.”

This last observation and inference are very important because this passage points us to Jesus as our ultimate intercessor (Hebrews 7:25; 4:14-16). As intercessors, we invite Jesus into each situation, and we say “Yes” to His plan.

Moses has a lot to teach us about intercession: corporateness, God’s holiness, God’s plan for the restoration of His people, God’s mission in the world.

Most importantly, this passage about Moses as an intercessor points us toward the only One whose intercession carries the power of atonement and the gift of salvation: Jesus Christ. Jesus is the One who leads us as intercessors in God’s great big mission in the world.

Praying in Your Dreams

If you have made yourself available to God as an intercessor, don’t be surprised if He prompts you to pray in your dreams. I can remember several instances of prayer during sleep. When I awoke, I knew I had been praying for someone. I’ve heard similar situations from intercessor friends.

One situation I remember vividly. In a dream while sleeping, someone called to me and asked that I join others in prayer. In my dream, I followed this person to a place where a large group of people stood in a circle, praying. I joined the circle and began to pray.

I could see there had been an accident. Two people had been critically wounded. Paramedics attended to them.

Leaning over the paramedics stood two large angels. I had the immediate sense that the two wounded people would not survive. The angels were there to minister salvation. That’s why we were praying and interceding: that the two people would be saved before they died.

We stood there quite a while, praying. And then I awoke from my dream.

It was early morning, and I felt disoriented because the scene had been so vividly real.

I turned on my radio, and the newscaster was saying two people had just been killed in a bomb explosion in Baghdad. I knew immediately those were the two people we had been interceding for, and I had incredible peace that they were now with Jesus.

If you, as an intercessor, make yourself available to God for however He wants to direct your prayers, don’t be surprised by the ways He will use your intercession. God bless your intercessor’s heart.

Intercessors: Don’t Forget to Cleanse

Spiritual Cleansing Prayer for Intercessors
Photo by Suju at Pixabay

Have you ever gone through an intense time of intercession? How did you feel when it was over? Intercessors often tell me they feel “black and blue,” as if they have been in a battle. Or they feel heavy or drained after praying for someone. Intercessors often take people home with them spiritually, mentally, and emotionally. They wrestle all night over what the person is going through.

If this is what intercession is like for you, you may be relieved to know it doesn’t have to be that way. Spiritual cleansing prayers can help you be restored to yourself after a time of intercession. You will find it easier to breathe and go about your life, trusting the person or situation to God’s care.

I’m not saying it is always easy to intercede. Sometimes it does get pretty intense, especially in travailing prayer. We need times of rest and recharging in between times of prayer. But overall, intercession doesn’t need to feel heavy or draining. You don’t need to wrestle all night long.

The Lord tells us His yoke is easy and His burden is light (Matthew 11:28-30). After all, He is the one carrying the person or situation we are interceding for. Jesus is the ultimate Intercessor (Hebrews 7:25). In order for Him to move on the person’s behalf or in the situation we are praying over, we need to get out of His way. When we overstep our bounds as intercessors, and try to take the situations on ourselves, we can actually block what the Lord is trying to do. Instead, He wants us to invite Him into each situation, and then let His Spirit work.

Cleansing Prayers: A Healthy Way to End a Prayer Session

One of the most effective practices that will help you get out of the Lord’s way is to pray cleansing prayers after your time of intercession. When you intercede for someone, you come into agreement with them, in the spirit realm, on the issues you are praying about. You make a type of spiritual connection as you approach the throne of God together (Hebrews 4:16). When you pray cleansing prayers to close out your time of intercession, it breaks the connection. That is the healthy way to end any time of intercession.

If you don’t intentionally break that spiritual connection when your prayer time is done, you could be taking that person home with you spiritually. That’s where the all-night wrestling and heaviness come in. If that person is being oppressed by the enemy, you might continue to be harassed yourself for hours or even days later.

It will help if you become intentional about saying cleansing prayers after your times of intercession. Otherwise, it is so easy to forget to pray cleansing prayers. We get caught up in the person’s situation, or what the Lord is doing. Then we say, “Amen” and go about our day. So make cleansing prayers a habit, a natural part of closing out each time of prayer.

Cleanse Where Any Spiritual Connection Is Made

Cleansing prayers are important whether you are praying with someone, in person, or praying on your own, from afar. Spiritually you are connected, either way. When you are in the company of the person you are praying with, it is important that they also hear your cleansing prayers (out loud), so they can be aware the connection is being broken. (Another purpose of praying this out loud is so the person will not think you had anything to do with the results of the prayer. You want them to focus only on Jesus.) If you are praying from afar, it is equally important that you pray for cleansing, for the other person’s sake as well as your own. You both need that temporary spiritual connection to be broken, so you can be restored to yourselves, stay connected only with Jesus, and go on your way.

Cleansing prayers are vital whether you are praying for one person or many. We have a team that goes into the local jail for ministry once a week. Before we leave, our whole team circles up to pray cleansing prayers. It has become our habit, and we don’t leave the property until we have done this. We take turns reminding each other to do our cleansing prayers, in case one of us should forget. We pray that we will be cleansed of anything we encountered in the jail, and also that the women we worked with will be cleansed from anything spiritual we brought in.

Spiritual Cleansing Prayer for Intercessors
Photo by Pixel2013 at Pixabay

If You Forget to Pray for Cleansing

If you forget to pray for cleansing, you will probably realize it soon afterward. If you are worrying about a situation in your mind the next day, did you pray cleansing? Pray it as soon as you realize it. It is never too late. If you feel like the enemy is following you home from a prayer session, did you pray cleansing?

There have been times when I have called my teammates on the phone after a prayer session and said, “We forgot to pray for cleansing.” And we will pray at that moment together. Usually I am prompted to make that call because I feel the enemy has harassed me all the way home. Once we pray for cleansing, the harassment stops. If I can’t reach a teammate by phone, I pray for their cleansing from afar. Then I email them and remind them to pray for cleansing too.

If a teammate has to leave a prayer session early, we will include them spiritually in our cleansing prayers at the end of our prayer time. And we will email and remind them to pray for cleansing as well. When it’s possible, we have a teammate step aside and pray cleansing over that person before they leave early. This may not always be logistically possible, but it is certainly a helpful habit to practice.

Practice Routine Cleansing Prayers

You want to be sure you leave any place spiritually cleansed after you’ve been praying there. Even when you’re not interceding, it’s a good idea to pray cleansing prayers whenever you leave a space. Ask God to clean up anything spiritual that you brought in. Whether it’s an office, a hotel room, or a friend’s house that you visit, pray for God to cleanse the atmosphere of any spiritual residue you might have left there.

If you are a church intercessor, make sure your prayer team has a practice in place for routine spiritual cleansing of the building and property. So many people move through a church on a regular basis, and they may be carrying all kinds of spiritual debris. That’s fine! That’s exactly what churches are for. Ideally, they leave that debris at the altar and go home with the peace of Christ. But as an intercessor for the church, you need to be sure your prayer team prays for God to sweep up that debris and loose the Holy Spirit in its place. When I used to serve in intercession at a church, I once told the church janitor, “We have similar jobs.”

A Sample Cleansing Prayer

A cleansing prayer can be very simple. The words are less important than the intent of your heart. The following cleansing prayer can help you get started, but let the Holy Spirit lead you each time. Prayers are not about being rote. They are about engaging in conversation in an active, ongoing relationship with God. You don’t want to pray with rote words any more than you would speak to your spouse that way. Just pray from your heart.

“Lord Jesus, thank You for everything you have done in ________ (this person’s heart, this situation, this place). We ask that You seal everything You’ve done, and we praise You for it. Lord, now cleanse each of us, so that we don’t take anything away from here that doesn’t belong to us. Wash us clean of anything we have picked up that is not of You. Return to each of us what is ours, cleansed by Your Spirit. Where we have made a spiritual connection to each other (or to other people), separate us and draw each of us back to You. In Jesus’ name. Amen”

Or simply:

“Lord Jesus, please cleanse us. Amen”

The Power of Blooming Where You Are Planted as an Intercessor

I am blessed with great friends who are intercessors. Each one is planted in a different environment for the purpose of changing the environment. I am always amazed when I hear their stories of how God moves them in prayer during their workday.

Several of my intercessor friends work in corporate environments. The situations, pressures, personality clashes, different religions represented in those environments are fertile ground for intercession. Their daily prayers at work truly change the atmosphere.

How do they know what to pray, and when? God prompts them. As intercessors, they are available to the Lord throughout their work day, in whatever ways He leads.

I remember my own experience working in corporate America, and I wish I had realized back then that God wanted me to pray. I remember flare-ups, crises, family dynamics, wounded hearts, and just plain daily challenges. At any of those moments, I might have been a vessel for God to change the atmosphere, had I known and been ready.

Intercessory prayer
Photo by Congerdesign at Pixabay

Are you called as an intercessor and placed in a secular environment? Ask God how He wants to use you to pray and change your atmosphere. Ask Him to tell you the reasons He has appointed you in that place, and what He desires to do through your prayers.

Then go to work every day, alert to your environment and attuned to God’s Spirit. Realize you are not just there to do a job, although your work is important. You are also there as a praying vessel, through whom God can affect the environment for His purposes. Set your heart in tune to His, the same way you would tune your transistor radio into a broadcast channel. Then listen; and be. He will prompt you.

Sometimes His promptings will not be obvious to you. You will simply find yourself praying in the spirit, and not knowing why. Just obey, and do as He leads. At other times, the circumstances will be obvious, and you will know to pray. Again, pray in the spirit, and let the Holy Spirit lead your prayers. He knows what He desires to do in that atmosphere, and He needs a willing intercessor – you! – to say, “Yes, Lord. Please do that. Have Your way here today.”

How amazing to go home at the end of the workday and realize you have lived, actively, in the kingdom of God today.

The corporate environment is just one example. I have another intercessor friend who works at a public school, where as we know, prayers are not allowed by staff. However, because she is attuned to God each day, she knows when and how to pray silently on behalf of the students. As she learns more about prayer, and the ways God works in people’s lives, she is able to pray more specifically. I know other teachers who pray for their students. They may not feel called specifically as intercessors, but there is a wealth of prayer happening at the public schools on any given day, which means God is moving in that atmosphere and changing students’ lives.

Intercessory Prayer
Photo by Reenablack at Pixabay

Another precious intercessor friend was led on a different path of prayer. She went through a difficult surgical procedure followed by a challenging recovery time. Before her surgery, a group of us prayed with her, and she told us, “I can’t wait for the surgery to be over, so God can start using me.”

What she didn’t realize was how much she had just ministered to us, by sharing how closely she felt to the Lord during this time. What a scary proposition she was facing medically, knowing the difficulties and the risks. She didn’t feel well to begin with, and now she had to accept a really hard road to walk with the Lord. But she focused on Him and felt His presence. She made a point to stay in His presence, and she let God bring her His strength and comfort. Whenever she felt afraid, or weak, she turned to the Lord and was encouraged. What struck me the most was her surrender, her willingness to just “be” with Him, no matter what she had to face.

Because of her peace and her surrender, she was ministering strength and encouragement to us, as we listened and prayed with her. She said she couldn’t wait for God to use her, once this was over. Yet here He was, using her right now.

I told her, “Your ministry has already begun.”

The next week, she went into the hospital for her surgery. Imagine all the ways God used her, as an intercessor, during the prep time at the hospital, with people all around her, and with her allowing the Holy Spirit to flow through her and to affect the atmosphere. Even during the difficult weeks of recovery, imagine how God used her as an intercessor to the hospital staff, to her visitors, and to those who were praying for her. So many people told her during that recovery time, “You have blessed me today.” She gave all the glory to God and told them of His constant presence and love. What a witness. All because she bloomed as an intercessor where she was planted.

When you are called as an intercessor, God intends to use you right where you are. He has placed intercessors all over the world, in every city, in every neighborhood. Some may not be aware of their calling; others may be aware, but unsure of how to step into their calling. But He has placed a network of intercessors worldwide, so that He can change our world.

This doesn’t mean God doesn’t move us around or call us into new environments and seasons. But for this moment, today, ask God how He desires to use you, right where you are.

Are you one of His intercessors? Whether you know you are, and have actively been praying, or whether you think you might be, and don’t know where to start – take this moment to talk with God. Ask Him for His vision for you as an intercessor. Realize that it starts right here, right now. Be ready to listen to Him, and keep your heart attuned to Him. And bloom, right where you’re planted. If every intercessor blooms in our own flower bed, God can truly change the world, and we will see the kingdom of God more and more, around us every day.

Three Voices – Yours, the Enemy’s, and God’s

Years ago, a little girl took one of my prayer classes. She heard from God easily and had a great relationship with Him. But she didn’t realize at first that not every voice in her mind was God’s.

She had a big decision to make, and she told her mother God told her what to do. Her mother asked, “Are you sure it was God?”

The little girl seemed puzzled. How could the voice she heard not be God?

Her mother explained that not every voice we hear is God. Sometimes we hear the enemy’s voice, and often we hear the voice of our own mind.

After a moment of shock, the little girl expressed her frustration, as she realized not every internal voice she heard was God’s.

Can’t we all relate with that frustration? How much easier life would be if all we heard was God’s voice, telling us clearly and exactly what to do.

If Not God’s Voice, Then Whose?

But we live in a fallen world. The enemy speaks to us, loudly and clearly. His voice often drowns out the still, small voice of God.

The enemy is not the only one talking. Often, we hear a voice louder and more damaging than the enemy’s. It’s the voice of our own mind. The things we say to ourselves, and have taught ourselves to say, can derail us. Our own voice, ringing through our mind, can block what God is trying to say.

Early in life, as we encounter hardships which, as children, we are not equipped to deal with, the enemy begins to tell us lies: “You are no good.” “You are stupid.” “You will never amount to anything.” “You don’t need God’s help, or anyone else’s, for that matter.” This happens as early as in the womb! The enemy starts the process, but we take it over. It’s as if he pushes the button on a tape player, and the tape repeats in our minds, over and over. We are the ones who keep it going, as we continue to block the voice of Father God.

Discerning God’s Voice from the Clutter

When you talk to God and listen for His response, it’s important to quiet your mind and let yourself hear Him. When you receive interference – from the enemy or from your own mind – be still. Turn once again toward God, and submit your mind to Him. Let Him speak in whatever way He desires.

How can you tell whose voice you are hearing? The more you talk with God, and listen, and be still in His presence, the more you will know the sound of His voice. Jesus says, “My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me” (John 10:27).

But there are also some checks you can make, to see whose voice you are hearing:

Do the words line up with God’s Word? Then you are probably hearing God. Do the words line up with God’s nature? It’s probably Him.

Do the words sound condemning or unloving? Do the words tear down the value of who you are as a person? That is not God.

Romans 8:1 tells us, “There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.” Romans 8:31 goes on to say, “What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?” God also tells us in John 3:16 that He “did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.”

God convicts us. But He doesn’t condemn us. When you hear a voice of condemnation, you are either hearing the enemy, or more likely the voice of your own mind. We often choose to beat ourselves up, where God has already forgiven us. We often tell ourselves harsh lies that are opposed to God’s Word.

Whenever you are listening for God’s words to you, check what you hear. Be sure it lines up with Scripture and the nature of God. If you do this check regularly, you will become more finely attuned to God’s presence and His voice.

My article, “Hearing God’s Voice” will help you to practice hearing and discerning through journaling.

What Blocks Your Hearing from God?

“Do you have cotton in your ears?” I remember my grandmother saying this whenever she thought we kids weren’t listening.

Sometimes I feel that way with God – that He knows I’m missing most of what He says. Why?

What Blocked Our Listening When We Were Kids?

Think about what it was like as a kid, when you didn’t listen. What were the reasons?

My list looked something like this:

  • Too busy, preoccupied.
  • Rebellious – didn’t want to hear, let alone respond.
  • Not really sure what the grownups were saying, so I tuned it out, or the words became distorted (like the teacher on Peanuts).
  • Didn’t like what I heard, or didn’t want to hear anything a grownup had to say on the matter.
  • Believed lies about myself, so whatever was really said became muted, muffled, or lost in translation.
  • Too many other voices in my head – mostly different parts of my own mind chastising or ridiculing myself.
  • Or just plain overwhelmed and checked out.

Those, and more, are the reasons we as kids often missed what grownups were trying to say to us. We missed helpful advice and direction. We missed expressions of love and concern. We missed fellowship.

The same can happen today in our communication with God. When our spiritual hearing becomes dull, we miss things.

How Can We Tune in to God’s Voice?

As an intercessor, you are no doubt interested in hearing from God clearly and frequently. How can you better attune your spiritual ears to hear Him?

One way is to identify what blocks your hearing.

This requires some heart introspection. What are the things in your heart that stand between you and God?

I went through many years of inner healing ministry to identify and allow God to remove many obstacles that blocked my hearing and my relationship with Him. I strongly recommend inner healing for everyone. We have all “stuff,” and it affects our relationship with God in more ways than just “hearing.”

Praying to Uncover What Blocks Us

Here is a starting point:

Ask God to search your heart and to reveal the things that block you from Him. That is one prayer He is very glad to answer. He began to answer me when I first prayed like this more than 12 years ago. He is still answering me to this day, showing me things in my heart that stand between me and Him.

Ask God to show you:

  • What lies you believe that are contrary to what His Word says.
  • Where you might hold unforgiveness or bitterness in your heart, or areas of your life where you might need to repent.
  • What lies you believe about Him, based on your relationship with primary caregivers in your young life. We often see God based on how we saw those first adults we encountered.
  • Where you have become consumed by religion, instead of relationship.
  • Any ways that fear or pride might block you from hearing Him.
  • Anything and everything in your heart that stands in the way of hearing and responding to Him.

Then realize that Jesus is here to help you pray through these blockages, to be healed, and to be free. Freedom means hearing your heavenly Father’s promptings, and responding to Him in love and prayer.

God Often Speaks in Silence

As an intercessor, it’s important to realize that you might not hear or sense God in ways that you would hear a person who walks into the room and speaks. God will have His own ways of communicating with you, and often His first language is silence. As an intercessor, your heart may simply beat strongly in tune with His, without you hearing a word.

So don’t take silence as an indication that you are not hearing.

But if you feel blocked in hearing from God (it’s usually a distinct feeling), the prayer detailed above can be a helpful starting point for drawing closer to Him and opening your heart even more to Him.

If you would like to learn more about hearing God, I recommend reading this wonderful article, “How Do I Learn to Hear God?” written by my friend Kerri Johnson at The Center for Inner Healing. It’s a quick read, and it gets to the heart of how we hear God.